Emily Baker

Emily Baker

My academic work originates from my experience of performing and writing songs. It was between writing, releasing and promoting two albums that I became aware of a burning desire to examine the pressures in process I was encountering from a cultural and critical theories perspective, interrogating that which might at first appear a 'natural' way of doing things.

My PhD is funded by the AHRC via the NWCDTP and is supervised by Freya Jarman and Sara Cohen. I am in the second year of examining the function, properties and impact of the aesthetic of Age in the voice. I am particularly interested in age as a site of resistance to normative assumptions of sex, gender and sexuality and how this is expressed in singing voices. As such, my study is underpinned by phenomenological, feminist and queer perspectives on identity and the body; discourse on Age/ ageing processes and studies on the voice and production practices in popular music.

In other words, I spend a lot of my time listening to, and watching the performances of, Dolly Parton, Aretha Franklin, Joni Mitchell, Patti Smith and Grace Jones.

  Jemima Cloud

 

Jemima Cloud

My research project acknowledges the enthusiasm for grotesque zombies in popular culture in recent years, overtaking the beautiful vampires that preceded them, and aims to understand their function in our lives. I will be using cultural theory and psychoanalysis to interpret this mass nightmare that our society is having, to understand why our fears and anxieties manifest in the form of a zombie. I will be doing this by looking at three particular metaphors that the zombie has been used for: race, sexuality, and class, and show how this has been achieved, and what the different reasons are for its manifestation in the given cultural context.

To do this, I will also be thinking about how other monsters have taken various roles in the past by looking at scholarship on mummies (both fictional and Egyptology-based research) and vampires, in both literature and AV media forms. The zombie has the power to be both unthreatening and even an object of comedy (particularly when in the singular) and also horrifying (particularly when found in hordes); as such, I will be drawing on theory from both comedy and horror, to explain the physiological, psychological and psychoanalytical effects that the zombie has on our stimuli at the point of spectacle. The focus point of my project is to then discuss the role of sound in these AV forms in conveying the underlying messages.

Jez Collins

Jez Collins

I’m a Research Fellow in the Centre for Media and Cultural Research at Birmingham City University where I teach and study Popular Music Industries.

My PhD research builds on my practice-based work as the founder of the Birmingham Music Archive. My PhD focuses on the role of citizen archivists who participate in the activist archiving of popular music histories and heritage in the online environment. These Doing-It-Together communities I suggest are creating alternate histories of popular music that serves to highlight the role music plays in the social, cultural and political life of people and communities. I am also a Trustee of the National Jazz Archive (UK), an advisory board member of the Community Archives and Heritage Group and Co-Director of Un-Convention, a global grassroots music network.

Monica Esslin-Peard

Monica Esslin-Peard

My PhD focuses on how undergraduate popular and classical musicians mature during their three years of study. This qualitative and quantitative research project draws on data from the annual assessed reflective essay which students write in combination with their end of year gig or recital.

Findings so far indicate that students are encouraged to ask questions about how they are practising, either as individuals, or in bands/ensembles, and this reflection may accelerate their learning. The 'Spirals of Reflection' model under development takes into account the wider socio-cultural, psychological and behavioural elements of musical learning.

I have an BA and MA from the University of Oxford, an MA in Music Education from the UCL Institute of Education in London and a mPGCE in Secondary Music. I combine my full time job as a Head of Music in London with PhD research and regular presentations at Music Education conferences in the UK, Ireland, Germany and Norway. I have been published in the UK and Germany and act as a a peer reviewer for Sage Publications.

I am an active musician, playing the cello with orchestras and opera companies in London and the South East, and I also conducts youth choirs.

Mat Flynn

Mat Flynn

I have an MA in Music Industries studies from the University of Liverpool. Since 2004 I have lectured music undergraduates in professional development at the Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts (LIPA).

Between 1996 and 2009 I worked in the UK as a self-employed independent music practitioner, setting up and running rehearsal studios and an independent record label. I have been a part-time PhD candidate since 2010, researching recorded music as an economy of attention and has presented  papers at various UK conferences on topics related to music reception, fandom and listening, music streaming, artists as entrepreneurs and copyright.

Þorbjörg Daphne Hall

I am programme director and lecturer of musicology in the Department of Music at the Iceland Academy of the Arts in Reykjavík.

I study under the supervision of Sara Cohen and my research project focuses on the idea of Icelandic sound in contemporary popular music where national identity, images, landscape and nature play a large role. I have published and presented internationally on Icelandic Music, Music and Nationalism in Iceland, Iceland Airwaves music festival and music in Christiania in Copenhagen.

Paul Kirby

Paul Kirby

My research is focused on the evolution and decline of the recording studio. Every phase in the development of the recording studio in the UK has been a result of the interplay between evolving technologies, the concepts and practices associated with audio production, trends in popular culture, and the structure/financial success of the recording industry within its specific geographic/social contexts. These factors have a fundamental effect upon the way in which the UK studio sector has developed over the past century, and the cultural products produced within it, consequently any nuanced understanding of the sector has to take all of these factors into account simultaneously. 

I've worked as a musician in bands, gained a major record deal and toured extensively in the UK and Europe. I also worked as a session musician, recording and gigging in the UK, Europe and America. Subsequently, I ran a small recording studio for some years and received a gold record for an album I worked on. I've worked as a lecturer in the FE sector since 2003. 

Chen-Yu Lin

Chen-Yu Lin

My research interests include Chineseness in Mandarin popular music, music censorship in the People’s Republic of China (PRC), and China Wind (Zhenguofeng) Pop Music.

I received a BA degree in Communication Studies in National Chengchi University (NCCU, Taiwan), and went to University of Wisconsin-Madison for international academic programme in my final year.

In 2013, I received a MA in Popular Music Studies with first class honours from University of Liverpool, and then continued to pursue a PhD studying with Dr. Haekyung Um and Prof. Sara Cohen.

I have worked for the Public Television Service (PTS, Taiwan) as a production assistant, and Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra as a research assistant. I also for Insight-Post, Pop Culture Academy, and World Island Magazine.

 My goal is to introduce the world of popular music studies to Chinese readers through my journalistic writing, and contribute to the knowledge of how Chinese communities worldwide engage with popular music through her current and future research. 

Liam Maloy

Liam Maloy

My PhD focusses on children’s music, specifically records made for children. I’m interested in the cultural construction of childhood through music - what those records say about children, but more importantly, what the adults who made those records are communicating to children about how they view children and childhood. I’ve looked at a number of case studies which highlight what I see as the main issues, including views of childhood innocence and its protection, adult nostalgia, and fears about the ‘up-aging’ or even disappearance of childhood. My case studies include the folk music of Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger, Music Hall and the music of The Muppet Show, the music of Bagpuss, the music played on BBC radio’s Children’s Choice, and tween music, specifically Hannah Montana and Miley Cyrus.

James Millea

James Millea

Originally from Ireland, I hold a first class honours bachelors degree in history and music (BA), and a masters degree in music and cultural history (MA) from University College Cork. Under the supervision of Dr. Danijela Kulezic-Wilson, my masters thesis focused on the construction of narrative identities and their proposed meanings for the filmic audience through the intertextual relationships and constructions in the language and music of Quentin Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds (2009). Currently my research at the Institute of Popular Music, which is part-funded by the University of Liverpool’s School of the Arts, explores hip-hop music’s role in the evolution of the contemporary African-American film soundtrack. Developing from a central cultural existence, this research argues for an understanding of hip-hop music as creative ‘process’ in the intermedial concept of ‘sampling’, as both compositional apparatus and aesthetic ideology. Through a focus on the New Black Realism of the 1990s, this research will determine those ways in which the remediation of hip-hop music’s enculturated aesthetics have advanced the (re)structuring and (re)organisation of sonic material in all three elements of the film soundtrack (music, sound effects and the spoken word). The study will construct both an interdisciplinary framework for the exploration of these aesthetics in the music, and most importantly, forward our discussions on the ever evolving existence of re-used material in the contemporary filmic soundscape.

I have presented papers on both my masters and doctoral research at numerous specialist and non-specialist conferences across both Ireland and the UK. I’m also a teaching assistant within the Institute of Popular Music, and the lecturer and coordinator for the department’s first year module on music in audio-visual media (2015/2016). 

Richard Talbot

Richard Talbot

Having worked as a musician for many years I came to academic study later in life. In 2012 I undertook an MA in Popular Music Studies at the University of Liverpool. I really enjoyed this experience and was keen to continue studying. For my PhD, I am researching Ambient music, an area that overlaps with my own musical activities. I am specifically interested in understanding how this music has evolved both conceptually and creatively, with a particular focus on hyperrealism, sound design and the creation of sonic spaces.